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August 2011

Noted lawyer urges Centre to address states' CRZ plans at Amity

 
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Floating danger

LYLA BAVADAM

Maritime disasters and abandoned vessels pose a serious threat to the Mumbai coast.

PAUL NORONHA 
 
After the collision of mv MSC Chitra with mv Khalijia-3 on August 7, 2010, in Mumbai harbour, a thick oil slick spread for seven nautical miles around the ships. Here, oil that washed ashore at the Elephanta caves.

IT is not unusual for those familiar with Mumbai harbour to talk of the wrecks that have from time to time littered the 11-metre-deep main navigation channel. In fact, local yachting clubs used them as markers for their weekly yacht races. For instance, one of the safety buoys marked a wreck that lay in the main channel for years, its masts clearly visible at ebb tide, until it was finally hauled away.

Scientists name world's most important marine conservation hotspots

Scientists have identified the 20 most important regions of the world's oceans and lakes that are key to ensuring the survival of the planet's marine mammals such as seals and porpoises. Their analysis also shows, however, that most of these areas are already under pressure from human impacts such as pollution and shipping.